Google RSS Reader Says Goodbye: Now What?

Generic_Feed-iconGoogle discontinued its popular Reader application on July 1, 2013, but that is no reason to fret, as several other quality alternatives provide the same Google RSS reader functionality that originally garnered so many fans. If you are still looking for something to replace Reader, take a look at some of these mobile and browser-based options.

Feedly Might Be the Best Reader Alternative

For many former Reader users, Feedly looks to be the best replacement for Google’s RSS reader. Available for both the iOS and Android platforms and most web browsers, Feedly offers a host of features that nicely position it to replace Reader. In fact, while Reader was still active, users were able to import their Reader feed subscriptions into Feedly.

While the service is primarily free, the company recently introduced Feedly Pro, which offers secure reading, advanced search capabilities, and premium support for a subscription fee of $5 per month or $45 per year. Feedly hopes to continue to add new features to both its free and premium services.

Curata Reader Offers a Clean Interface

Those of you who prefer an uncluttered interface need to check out Curata Reader. It is a web-based RSS reader application featuring attractive fonts and a modern look and feel with tons of white space. No mobile apps are available for the service, but Curata Reader does offer a mobile-optimized site for reading from your iPhone, iPad, or Android device.

Digg’s Reader Provides a Social View

Digg provides both a browser-based reader as well as an app for the iOS platform. One thing that sets it apart from other RSS readers it its integration with, so it displays what stories are currently popular on the web. Other than that, it offers a standard set of RSS reader features, serving well as an alternative for Google Reader.

Many alternatives to the Google RSS Reader experience exist today, so the easiest thing is to try a few of them to see which one is the best fit for your reading habits.

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